Jenn Warren
<i>'As you see us now, we don’t have food to eat, we don’t have clothes. Lol Nuer killed many of our people. We are only the few people remaining. We can’t stay here. We are hiding ourselves in the bush, on the bank of the river. During the day we come back to Torkej to dismantle our tukuls and huts. To dismantle the tukul takes 10 days, and then we transport the wood to the bank of the river and take it to Nasir. When we sell the wood, we will buy a little sorghum and share it.'</i>Nyabol Badeng, from Torkej, dismantles her tukul to sell the wood and grass in Nasir for food. Torkej, Jikany Nuer territory, was attacked on 8 May by the larger Lol Nuer tribe, and is vulnerable to repeated cattle raids and attacks because of their placement on the river and proximity to Lol Nuer lands. Nyabol's 8 children and husband were all killed in the nighttime raid, and she is terrified to return home for fear of another violent attack. The Lol Nuer are perpretrators of repeated cattle raids and attacks against the Dinka, Murle, and Jikany Nuer sub-tribe. Tribal violence overall in Southern Sudan has dramatically increased in 2009, with over 2000 deaths, more people than have been killed in Darfur.
'As you see us now, we don’t have food to eat, we don’t have clothes. Lol Nuer killed many of our people. We are only the few people remaining. We can’t stay here. We are hiding ourselves in the bush, on the bank of the river. During the day we come back to Torkej to dismantle our tukuls and huts. To dismantle the tukul takes 10 days, and then we transport the wood to the bank of the river and take it to Nasir. When we sell the wood, we will buy a little sorghum and share it.'

Nyabol Badeng, from Torkej, dismantles her tukul to sell the wood and grass in Nasir for food. Torkej, Jikany Nuer territory, was attacked on 8 May by the larger Lol Nuer tribe, and is vulnerable to repeated cattle raids and attacks because of their placement on the river and proximity to Lol Nuer lands. Nyabol's 8 children and husband were all killed in the nighttime raid, and she is terrified to return home for fear of another violent attack. The Lol Nuer are perpretrators of repeated cattle raids and attacks against the Dinka, Murle, and Jikany Nuer sub-tribe. Tribal violence overall in Southern Sudan has dramatically increased in 2009, with over 2000 deaths, more people than have been killed in Darfur.

Jenn Warren

Info

Jenn Warren specialises in photography, communications and Communications for Development (C4D) for humanitarian and development clients. Her photography and writing has been published in the Sunday Times Magazine, TIME, Rolling Stone, The Independent, BBC News Online and AlJazeera English, among others.

Jenn has worked for a wide range of government, donor, UN and NGO clients including USAID, UKaid, Médecins Sans Frontières, International Committee for the Red Cross, Amnesty International, Save the Children, PSI, Malaria Consortium, Sonke Gender Justice Network, Inyathelo, the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, the National Democratic Institute, CARE, the British Council, UNHCR, UNESCO, WFP/PAM, UNDP and UNICEF.

As a Communications Consultant, she provides products to suit government, donor, and NGO/NPO needs using still photography, audio, video, text and design.

Jenn also leads photography and communications workshops for youth and professionals, and is proficient in Arabic and American Sign Language. Her photography is exhibited and collected internationally.

+ 27 72 833 8977

+ 1 646 867 1883

skype: jlwphoto

info@jennwarren.net